NNPC boss solicits Oba of Benin’s support for protection of oil facilities from vandals


Benin – Dr. Maikanti Baru, the Group Managing Director of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), has urged the  Oba of Benin, Oba  Ewuare II, to assist in the  protection of  the corporation’s facilities from vandals.
Baru said this in Benin on Wednesday  when he paid homage  to the monarch.
He said NNPC had two major companies in Benin, the Nigeria Petroleum Development Company (NPDC) and Integrated Data Service (IDSL).
Baru said the  support was needed to end  pipeline vandalism, adding that NNPC was using a  huge  sum of money to repair the  pipelines destroyed

The NNPC chief executive also appealed to Oba Ewuare II to help educate the people of oil and gas producing communities  to create enabling environment that woild,  in the short term,  provide economic benefits to the people.
He assured the Oba  that NNPC would continue to  provide  scholarships to the youth in the  host communities, especially those studying related courses and the orphans.
Oba Ewuare urged Baru and the  NNPC to do more in the provision of contracts and employments to the people in the host communities.
The monarch  further appealed to  the NNPC to do more in providing sufficient food for the people.

2 men accused of fondling breast


Abeokuta –  Idris Sodiya and Sodiq Odebiyi of no given addresses were arraigned at Magistrates’ Court in Isabo, Abeokuta on Wednesday  charged with fondling breast.
The accused are facing a three-count charge of felony, breach of peace and assault.
The prosecutor, Sgt. Idowu Ogunleye, told the court that the accused committed the offences on Nov. 27 at about 7.30 a.m. at Leme area in Abeokuta.
According to Ogunleye, the accused assaulted and touched the breast of one Miss Rasheedat Adesina, student of Lisabi Grammar School.
She said the accused, on Nov. 28, conducted themselves in a manner likely to cause a breach of peace by disturbing the peace of the school.
The prosecutor said the offences contravened sections 516, 360 and 248 of the Criminal Code Vol. 1, Law of Ogun, 2006.
The duo pleaded not guilty to the charges.
The Magistrate, Mrs Fatimat Ojelade, granted the accused bail in the sum of N100,000 each with two sureties each in like sum.
She adjourned the case to Jan. 11, 2017 for trial.

Nigeria loses 650,000 bpd on budgeted output of crude oil to vandals, pirates

By The Rainbow
Depressed oil prices, rampant corruption, and pipeline vandalism are only parts of Nigeria's oil problem. It's now losing a massive 400,000 barrels of crude daily to pirates in the Gulf of Guinea, an amount equal to the entire daily export capacity of its Forcados terminal.

Overall damage from piracy, theft and fraud for Africa's largest oil exporter is estimated at some $1.5 billion a month, according to U.S. deputy ambassador to the UN, Michele Sison, citing a Chatham House report.
Attempts by local governments and the UN to put a stop to piracy have met with some success, but the practice continues — shifting location and adapting to new security measures, so now the UN Security Council is calling for a comprehensive framework of measures aimed at eradicating it.
Since 2014, says the UN, Gulf of Guinea piracy has increased at an alarming rate.
Two pirate attacks on April 11 affected seven countries. The cargoes came from Nigeria, Turkey and Greece; the ships were flying Maltese and Liberian flags; and the 8 missing crewmen were from the Egypt, the Philippines and Turkey.
In the first quarter of this year alone, there were six recorded pirate attacks in the Gulf of Guinea, and six attempted attacks. Nine of those were off the coast of Nigeria, while one was off the coast of Côte d'Ivoire, and two were within the territorial waters of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Last year, there were 100 similar incidents in the Gulf of Guinea, according to the UK's ambassador to the UN, Peter Wilson.
Dealing with the pirates requires an international effort, and particularly a coordinated effort by those countries near the Gulf of Guinea. There isn't much Nigeria can do on its own. Without a major overhaul of intelligence sharing and local law enforcement collaboration and training, the piracy scourge will continue to worsen
Nigeria has thrown its lot in the fight against pirates, but it has too much on its plate already. Plagued by low oil prices, pipeline vandalism and stalling reforms at its state oil company, the country has more than enough to worry about in addition to losses to pirates.
In March, Nigeria pumped 1.677 million barrels of crude, which was a decline on the previous month's 1.744 million. According to a Financial Times analysis, the decline is set to continue over the coming years, largely because the reforms at the NNPC, pledged by new president Muhammadu Buhari to tackle long-time corruption and inefficiency, have so far not yielded any actual results.
In addition to dealing with corruption, as part of the reforms, Buhari's government planned to change the terms of the production-sharing agreements it has with foreign oil companies operating in the country. Oil majors with a Nigerian presence said at the time that such a move could deter investments and ultimately have a negative effect on oil revenues.
All in all, Nigeria has sunk deeper and deeper, and even a continued oil price rally would not be sufficient to prop it up as production continues to decline.
For June, Nigeria plans to export 1.57 million barrels of crude, for instance, compared with 1.6 million barrels scheduled to leave its shores in May. What's more, its budget for 2016 had envisaged a daily output of 2.2 million barrels—an amount unlikely to be reached in the short-term.


Video: El-Rufai Goes On His Knees, Begs Kogi To Forgive Governor Yahaya Bello

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